Ford: Kentucky Truck Plant will not have traditional summer shutdown weeks

Ford said employees will work during typical shutdown weeks in late June and early July to build “must-have” vehicles.

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — After multiple shutdowns due to a global semiconductor shortage, Ford Motor Company announced several assembly plants will be open during traditional summer shutdown weeks.

Ford said the Kentucky Truck Plant employees will join plants in Michigan, Ohio and Illinois in working during typical shutdown weeks in late June and early July to build “must-have” vehicles. The decision means more U.S. plants will be working this summer than in more than 15 years.

The Kentucky Truck Plant produces the Ford F-250 and F-550 Super Duty Trucks, Expedition and Lincoln Navigator. Around 8,600 hourly employees will be impacted by the change.

“We understand these schedule disruptions are inconvenient,” said John Savona, Ford’s vice president of manufacturing and labor affairs. “We also appreciate that this year’s summer schedule may be disappointing to those who look forward to time away during the traditional shutdown weeks.”

Savona said employees will need to schedule vacation days through their local vacation scheduling process.

The company previously announced it would shut down the Louisville Assembly Plant, which makes the Ford Escape and Lincoln Corsair, during the weeks of April 12 and April 19. The Louisville Assembly Plant has faced shut downs in January and February due to the shortage.

Plants joining the Kentucky Truck Plant in working during tradition shutdown weeks include the Dearborn Truck Plant, Michigan Assembly Plant, Flat Rock Assembly Plant, Ohio Assembly Plant, Chicago Assembly Plant and Kansas City Assembly Plant.

The Chicago Assembly Plant, Flat Rock Assembly Plant and Kansas City Assembly Plant’s transit side will also shut down during the week of April 12.

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